This program aims to develop global process-resolving models to help quantify the roles of climate feedbacks in anthropogenic climate change. Abrupt and extreme climate changes from anthropogenic warming pose some of the greatest risks to society and the environment. Understanding of the complex interactions involved with feedbacks is critical.

Highlights

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MULTISCALE Methods for Accurate, Efficient, and Scale-Aware Earth System Models

MULTISCALE is a Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Earth System Modeling project, begun in July 2012 and running through July 2017, with the primary goal of producing better climate models to serve as the scientific tools and predictive tools that will address the needs of both the climate sciences and policy-oriented communities.

Program Overview

Questions to solve through improved modeling: How do the hydrological cycle, and water resources, interact with the climate system on local to global scales? How do biogeochemical cycles interact with global climate change? How do rapid changes in cryospheric systems interact with the climate system? How do short-term variations in natural and anthropogenic radiatively active atmospheric constituents interact with natural variability and contribute to regional and global environmental change?

This program aims to develop global process-resolving models to help quantify the roles of climate feedbacks in anthropogenic climate change. Abrupt and extreme climate changes from anthropogenic warming pose some of the greatest risks to society and the environment. Understanding of the complex interactions involved with feedbacks is critical.

Climate Modeling is one of three Programs within the Earth and Environmental Sciences Area’s Climate and Carbon Sciences Program Area. The key sponsors of this research are the DOE-BER Climate and Earth System Modeling Program and DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing.

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