Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division

Novel Monitoring Strategy Uncovers New Insights to Arctic Ecosystems

Earth & Environmental Sciences Area/Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s Baptiste Dafflon (right) and Craig Ulrich (left) make soil moisture measurements with a TDR and active layer depths with a tile probe.

Researchers in Berkeley Lab’s Environmental & Earth Sciences Area (EESA) have led the development of a new approach for monitoring terrestrial ecosystems, and have used the system to discover new insights about how processes in different compartments of an Arctic Tundra ecosystem interact over space and time.

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The Art of Studying—and Sharing—Snowmelt Science in a Mountain Watershed

As an ecologist working with the Environmental & Earth Science Area’s Watershed Scientific Focus Area (SFA), Heidi Steltzer and her research assistant, Chelsea Wilmer, spend a lot of time conducting fieldwork in the picturesque Colorado mountains. Now, as she’s studying snowmelt and its effects on plant growth in Crested Butte, Colorado, Steltzer is bringing the SFA’s science to a much wider audience.

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EESA Faculty Scientist Mary Firestone Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Mary Firestone

Mary Firestone Mary Firestone, a professor of soil microbiology at UC Berkeley’s Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, has been elected to The National Academy of Sciences. Election to the National Academy is considered to be a high honor, as nominations are reserved for scientists who demonstrate distinguished and continuing achievements in their fields. As a…

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Peter Fiske Joins Berkeley Lab as Water-Energy Resilience Institute Director

Peter Fiske

Berkeley Lab has chosen Peter Fiske, who holds a doctorate in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University, to lead the Water-Energy Resilience Institute as its first director. The Institute is a Lab-wide initiative aimed at increasing resilience in a future world that will face both water and energy constraints, and is linked to the…

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Building the Next Generation of Scientists: EESA at STEM Career Awareness Day

Christina Patricola

As a middle school student in eastern Massachusetts, Earth and Environmental Sciences Area (EESA) research scientist Christina Patricola became fascinated with the snowstorms that frequently blanketed her hometown—and quickly recognized her passion for atmospheric science. But despite her early interest, Patricola says she doesn’t know if she would have continued on a scientific career path…

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EESA Releases Strategic Vision 2025

Strategic Vision 2025 cover — Earth & Environmental Sciences strategic plan for the next decade. Copyright Berkeley Lab.

Berkeley Lab’s Earth & Environmental Sciences Area has just released its strategic plan, EESA Strategic Vision 2025 —well-timed to the 47th Anniversary of Earth Month this April! This strategic plan describes the collective vision of EESA’s scientists for the next decade, and outlines five ambitious Grand Challenges, and future goals for three Cross-Cutting Technologies & Platforms.…

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Negrón-Juárez et al. and Their Pioneering Study on Amazon Windthrows

Photos cr. Ms.Raquel Araujo, using a drone. This windthow (2.88S, 60.28W) occurred in 2015 close to the city of Taruma in Central Amazonia.

Robinson Negrón-Juárez and his co-authors have now published the first study on windthrow variability, focusing on Central Amazonia. Windthrows destroy large swaths of trees, play a significant role in forest structures and dynamics, and affect carbon storage. In this study the co-authors present the seasonal and interannual variability of windthrows, and discuss the potential meteorological factors…

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Study: Soils Could Release Much More Carbon Than Expected as Climate Warms

Scientists working in Blodgett Forest

Soils could release much more CO2 than expected into the atmosphere as the climate warms, according to new research by scientists in EESA's Climate and Ecosystems Sciences Division—Caitlin Hicks Pries, Christina Castanha, Rachel Porras, and Margaret Torn.

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