Publication

Dark Fiber: Using Sensors Beneath Our Feet to Tell Us About Earthquakes, Water, and Other Geophysical Phenomenon

  Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown for the first time that dark fiber – the vast network of unused fiber-optic cables installed throughout the country and the world – can be used as sensors for detecting earthquakes, the presence of groundwater, changes in permafrost conditions, and…

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Seawater Chemistry May Have Influenced the Exchange of Elements Between Oceans and Earth throughout History

New research from scientists within the Earth and Environmental Sciences Area at Berkeley Lab and others at UC Berkeley indicates that changes in the composition of seawater during the past 500 million years may have previously unrecognized effects on the composition of hydrothermal fluids flowing back into the oceans throughout millions of years. scientists may have previously overestimated the amount of weathering and erosion – the removal of material from land – needed from rivers to change the ocean’s composition over geologic time.

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Cool Roofs Have Water-Saving Benefits Too

The energy and climate benefits of cool roofs have been well established: By reflecting rather than absorbing the sun’s energy, light-colored roofs keep buildings, cities, and even the entire planet cooler. Now a new studyby the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that cool roofs can also save water by…

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EESA Research Shines Light on Role Soil Microbes Play in Carbon Sequestration

Microbes in soil respond differently to plants that are rich in carbon than to those rich in nitrogen, according to new research by postdoctoral fellow Rose Abramoff of Berkeley Lab’s Earth and Environmental Sciences Area and colleagues at the University of Maryland and Boston University. Abramoff is an ecologist working in the Climate Sciences Department…

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Skin Microbiome Changes With Age, EESA Scientist Discovers

Hoi-Ying Holman

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms – ­and they’re not just bacteria. A study by a researcher at Berkeley Lab's Earth & Environmental Sciences Area (EESA) and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age.

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EESA Researchers Solve Deepwater Horizon Mystery

Gary Andersen

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 is one of the most studied spills in history, yet scientists haven’t agreed on the role of microbes in eating up the oil. Now EESA researchers have identified all of the principal oil-degrading bacteria as well as their mechanisms for chewing up the many different components that make up the released crude oil.

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Novel Monitoring Strategy Uncovers New Insights to Arctic Ecosystems

Earth & Environmental Sciences Area/Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s Baptiste Dafflon (right) and Craig Ulrich (left) make soil moisture measurements with a TDR and active layer depths with a tile probe.

Researchers in Berkeley Lab’s Environmental & Earth Sciences Area (EESA) have led the development of a new approach for monitoring terrestrial ecosystems, and have used the system to discover new insights about how processes in different compartments of an Arctic Tundra ecosystem interact over space and time.

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Study: Soils Could Release Much More Carbon Than Expected as Climate Warms

Scientists working in Blodgett Forest

Soils could release much more CO2 than expected into the atmosphere as the climate warms, according to new research by scientists in EESA's Climate and Ecosystems Sciences Division—Caitlin Hicks Pries, Christina Castanha, Rachel Porras, and Margaret Torn.

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New Study: Global Plant Models Underestimate Shading of Plants

Sun shining through tropical forest

EESA’s Trevor Keenan and collaborator Ülo Niinemets of the Estonian University of Life Sciences and Estonian Academy of Sciences have just published a new study in a Letter in Nature Plants that concludes that global plant databases and models are underestimating plant growth rates and photosynthesis, plus other traits, because leaf measurements are reported as…

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