Research Highlight

Negrón-Juárez et al. and Their Pioneering Study on Amazon Windthrows

Photos cr. Ms.Raquel Araujo, using a drone. This windthow (2.88S, 60.28W) occurred in 2015 close to the city of Taruma in Central Amazonia.

Robinson Negrón-Juárez and his co-authors have now published the first study on windthrow variability, focusing on Central Amazonia. Windthrows destroy large swaths of trees, play a significant role in forest structures and dynamics, and affect carbon storage. In this study the co-authors present the seasonal and interannual variability of windthrows, and discuss the potential meteorological factors…

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EESA Unveils Its 10-Year Research Strategy

The Earth and Environmental Sciences Area (EESA) recently held a townhall (Oct. 31) to preview the upcoming release of its 10-year strategic plan. Deputy Director Horst Simon, as well as Directors from other Lab Areas, joined the full house. Five Grand Challenges have been identified to drive EESA’s research over the coming decade: Earth’s Microbial…

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Which processes most strongly govern terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks in Earth system models?

Graphic comparing various turnover times for carbon in vegetation and soil carbon pools.

ESMs (Earth system models) are crucial in estimating climate sensitivity, but show large uncertainty in carbon cycle feedbacks. A key step of reducing this uncertainty is to identify the processes that govern carbon-climate and carbon-concentration feedbacks driven by changes in terrestrial carbon stocks. Are these changing carbon stocks driven by changes to inputs, or changes…

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Characterizing Arctic Ecosystem Functional Zones

A multidisciplinary team of researchers led by ESD’s Haruko Wainwright developed an ecosystem functional zonation approach to characterize the spatial variability of properties that influence carbon cycling in the Arctic – in high resolution and over landscape scales.

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